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Sporting Excellence #0014 => May 2006
May 31, 2006
MAY 2006

This newsletter is brought to you by:

http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com

You can view back issues online here:

http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/Sporting_Excellence-backissues.html

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TABLE OF CONTENTS - MAY 2006

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Here's the contents in brief for this issue of Sporting Excellence

1. Energy Systems in Sport & Exercise

2. VO2 Max, Aerobic Power & Maximal Oxygen Uptake

3. Anaerobic & Lactate Threshold Explained

4. How to Determine Your Lactate Threshold

5. Idaho Sport Attitude Study Announces $500 Scholarship

6. Lactate Threshold Training

7. Lactic Acid, Blood Lacate and the "Lactic Acid Myth"

8. Integrated Training for Improved Cycling Performance - Part 2

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1. Energy Systems in Sport & Exercise

Essential guide to energy systems and how they effect the human body during various types of activity...

http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/energysystems.html

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2. VO2 Max, Aerobic Power & Maximal Oxygen Uptake

VO2 max is considered the best indicator of cardiorespiratory endurance. But can it predict performance in elite athletes and to what extent can it be improved?

http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/VO2max.html

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3. Anaerobic & Lactate Threshold Explained

Despite debate over blood lactate and its role in exercise, the lactate threshold is still used as an effective predictor of performance. But is it more accurate than OBLA or MLSS?

http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/lactate-threshold.html

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4. How to Determine Your Lactate Threshold

There are several methods used to determine an athlete’s lactate threshold. While the most accurate and reliable is through the direct testing of blood samples during a graded exercise test, this is often inaccessible to most performers...

http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/anaerobicthreshold.html

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5. Idaho Sport Attitude Study Announces $500 Scholarship

Moscow, Idaho May 25, 2006 – The Idaho Sport Attitude Study (ISAS) is offering a chance to win a $500 scholarship to high school athletes who complete a brief online survey at http://www.isasonline.com, by June 15, 2006.

The ISAS project aims to help sport psychology researchers better assess and understand how positive and negative tendencies associated with perfectionism, and other aspects of achievement motivation, relate to athlete’s participation in competitive sport. According to graduate student Michael Pickering, designer of the study, “Evidence is growing that suggests perfectionist inclinations can both enhance and detract from performance and overall sport experience. So it is important to identify the beneficial characteristics as well as those that are less advantageous. Unfortunately, we do not have an established and validated sport-specific instrument for assessing the various dimensions of perfectionism exhibited by young athletes.”

He adds, “...Counseling and clinical psychology researchers have been studying the ramifications associated with perfectionism for several years by treating it as a general personality trait. This approach has helped to identify intriguing questions that relate to sport. But we really need to better identify and assess these tendencies more specifically within competitive contexts…”

Any high school student that participated in at least one interscholastic sport, during the 2005-2006 school year, is invited to participate in the study. The researchers hope to gain responses from individuals who do exhibit some perfectionist characteristics, and from those who tend not to. Pickering emphasizes “… There are no right or wrong answers to the survey questions. We simply want to better understand what types of expectations young athletes hold regarding their sport participation.”

Responses to the ISAS online survey will be used to help develop a valid instrument for assessing perfectionist characteristics among young athletes. The survey consists of approximately 100 brief statements. Participants indicate how strongly they agree or disagree with each by clicking on an appropriate button. All responses are completely anonymous, and the entire survey takes only about 15 minutes to complete. At the conclusions of the survey participants are invited to enter into a random drawing for a $500 scholarship by entering an email contact address that is kept separate from the actual survey responses. A summary of the study results will also be available to anyone who registers to receive one by email at the ISAS website.

For additional information about the ISAS research project, or the $500 scholarship, contact tpickering@uidaho.edu or visit http://www.isasonline.com

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6. Lactate Threshold Training

Lactate threshold training will help to improve performance times in endurance events such as distance running, cycling and swimming. As its name suggests, this form of conditioning is designed to increase the exercise intensity at which the anaerobic or lactate threshold occurs...

http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/lactate-threshold-training.html

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7. Lactic Acid, Blood Lacate and the "Lactic Acid Myth"

Is lactic acid a friend or foe? How does it differ from lactate? This article examines current research on the role of lactic acid in exercise...

http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/lactic-acid.html

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8. Integrated Training for Improved Cycling Performance - Part 2

The previous article looked at postural issues and possible muscles imbalances involved with cycling. Now that we have an understanding of the imbalances that arise from a prolonged cycling position, we can develop an effective program for correcting those postural distortions.

The first part of the program is stretching the muscles that were identified as tight in the previous article (calves, quads, hip flexors, hamstrings, pectorals, trapezius, and neck flexors). Stretching returns muscles to their proper length-tension relationship. As stated in the previous article, tight muscles alter joint positions which in turn affect the opposing muscles ability to function properly. Each stretch should be held at least 20-30 seconds.

The next component is five minutes of light cardiovascular activity to increase blood flow to the active muscles and increase the efficiency of the kinetic chain. Treadmill or elliptical are great choices.

Core stabilization training is next. Stabilization training involves improving the ability of the transverse abdominis, internal obliques and the pelvic floor muscles too effectively stabilize the spine and pelvis during cycling. Stabilization exercises involve little to no movement through the lower back, hips, and pelvis. Exercises include a progression of teaching the lower abdominals and pelvic floor muscles to stabilize the spine correctly. Exercises include abdominal bracing (aka “drawing-in” maneuver), bridges, the DOG (quadruped) series of exercises, and planks. These exercises should be performed with 12-20 reps with a slow controlled movement.

Balance is a requirement during any type of riding, (endurance, tempo, sprints, climbing, etc) and involves a series of coordinated actions involving the muscular, nervous, and skeletal systems (aka , the kinetic chain). Balance training is designed to improve the body’s kinetic chain efficiency. Performing simple exercises like balancing on one leg force the muscles surrounding the hip, knee, and ankle to stabilize their respective joints. As you become more balanced, you can gradually add slow controlled movements like single leg reaches and/or single leg squats.

The strength training portion of the program is designed to improve dynamic joint stabilization by performing exercises that are slow and controlled with higher repetitions. The strength exercises are performed using stability balls, dumbbells, and incorporating balance. Each exercise should be performed with 2-3 sets, 12-20 reps and can be performed in a circuit fashion. The speed should be 4-2-2, meaning, 4 seconds down, 2 seconds hold, 2 seconds up. This slow speed allows the muscles to stabilize the joints and increases force production and force reduction. Exercises focus on the major muscles of body (chest, back, shoulders, legs).

By Dave Radin, CSCS, NASM-CPT http://www.lakenormanfitness.com. You can contact Dave at 704-662-8664, or by email at davefradin@netzero.net

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That's it for this issue of Sporting Excellence.

Remember if you have any questions regarding this issue's content (or sports training in general) I can be contacted at:

http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/contactus.html

All the best,

Phil Davies (editor)

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